News

Take Time in Fall to Prepare Roof for Winter Weather

Bade Roofing - Monday, October 01, 2018

 

When it comes to roof maintenance, the old adage "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure," could not be more true...

 


 

particularly during the fall and winter months when sleet, snow and freezing temperatures make their comeback.

 

When colder temperatures arrive, membrane roof systems become harder and less flexible, and as a result, are more susceptible to damage by puncture and sharp objects.

 

Because roofing technicians and specialists are trained in proper roof maintenance and repair, many building/facility managers turn to experienced commercial roofing contractors, to inspect, service and prepare their roofs for the approaching severe weather.

 

There are some simple tasks building/facility managers can perform in the fall to prepare their roofs for the winter:

 

When your rooftop is covered with snow and ice, finding annoying roof leaks is close to impossible. That’s why it’s a good idea to take the time to check ceilings and interior walls for signs of leaks, such as stains, and seal all roof leaks possible before the weather gets bad. Late summer and early fall is the ideal time to check exterior walls for leaks, stains, cracks in bricks and any missing mortar. Sealing these will keep the cold air out and your valuable heat in.

 

Cold weather has a tremendous effect on loose mortar and composite building materials. Cold temperatures can cause already loose materials to contract, leaving gaps for damaging water and winds to enter your building. This is why checking any roof deck and fascia/coping for signs of deterioration before the first snow or ice storm hits is crucial. Look for any deteriorated caulking around loose metal work, thin sections of membrane, signs of excessive movement and splits at expansion joints. You will also want to check all penetrations on your roof such as pipe boots, pitch pockets and vent pipes, in addition to regrets areas for flashings, deteriorated caulking and voids in the caulking, chimney flashings and brick and mortar joints. To prevent contamination, any point of air or water infiltration should be checked and immediately restored to a properly sealed condition.

 

Another cause of roof failure during winter months is drainage problems. This is why checking and clearing all gutters, downspouts and scuppers is imperative. All drains should be cleaned out of leaves and debris so drainage water can move freely. Strainers and clamping rings should also be checked. Water weight in a dysfunctional gutter system can loosen the attachment of the guttering to the structure, causing further damage to your building.

 

A roof can leak if snow accumulates on the roof and over flashings. This is why you’ll want to check all attachments of base flashing and counter flashing. An experienced roofing contractor should be called in to survey the field of the roof membrane and redistribute all ballast across any bare spots. If there are any tears or holes in the membrane, these should be repaired immediately.

 

Every winter is different with more snowfall some years than others. This is why it’s a good idea to have several thick brush brooms ready in the event you need to remove ice or snow from around roof top units. Wind-driven snow can pile up against curbs and walls and if the snow is higher than the flashing it can create a real problem when it starts to melt. If there is a major snow event, then it is best to contact a roofing professional to remove snow and ice in these critical areas.

 

Diligent maintenance of a green roof is recommended to prevent long-term damage to the underlying roofing materials. Be sure to remove any tree seedlings that may have started to sprout this fall as these can create strong roots that can damage the roof's drainage system. Also be sure to remove as many leaves and debris around the drains and in corners to maintain adequate drainage and sunlight around vegetation. Remove any dead plants and prune overgrown bushes and flowerbeds to allow for maximum sunlight and water to reach the vegetation and prevent ponding water.

 

Finally, before the snow and ice hits make sure you inform all personnel that walking on a membrane roof or modified roof is dangerous during the winter because of fall hazards. Let personnel know that no one should walk on the rooftop after dark or before 10 a.m. as this is when icy conditions are more likely to occur.

By taking these simple preventative steps, you’ll keep personnel and occupants safer and warmer and your building's roof will be better prepared to take on whatever the winter has in store.

 

Roofing System Selection Tips

Bade Roofing - Thursday, August 16, 2018

When choosing a roofing system, it seems the options are endless. But it’s important to remember not all roofing systems are the same; there are a number of variables you’ll want to consider in order to make a well-informed decision. Consider the following factors.

 

Geographical Location – Consider building codes, weather trends, and the direction your building faces. There’s no such thing as a one-size-fits-all roofing system because geographic variations in wind velocity, potential snow load and annual rainfall all vary from location to location and year to year. Roof orientation and nearby trees that will shade the roof are important factors.

 

  • Physical Makeup – Consider your building’s size, age, shape, design as well as the facility’s new or existing structure.
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  • Building Materials/Construction – Consider the buildings materials types - wood, steel, brick, and the current types of HVAC and fire protection equipment.
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  • Roof Details – Consider the size, shape, slope, deck, edge, protrusions and rooftop access. Some roofs have very little traffic, while others require walkways that provide access to rooftop units. If your new roof will have high foot traffic needs, it will need additional structural pathway support.
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  • The Buildings Use – Consider the building’s occupancy, insulation needs and maintenance schedule. For example, a retail business has different roofing needs than those of a storage facility. Both require leak-free roofs, but the retail business will need a roof that provides a comfortable environment for customers and staff. The right roof for a warehouse wouldn’t be sufficient for a shopping center, a hospital or a school building.
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  • Green Needs – Does the roof require LEED® certification credits or does it need to meet ENERGY STAR® goals? We all want to save money on utility costs, and if that’s an important factor for you, a cool roof or a reflective roof might be beneficial. Beefed-up insulation and photovoltaic (PV) systems can also help you achieve your energy goals.
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  • Renewability – Take into account the ease at which materials can be replaced at the end of the warranty period. All roofs need regular periodic maintenance, but not all roof systems can be successfully maintained by an in-house crew.
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  • Recyclability – Consider how the materials can be recycled or down-cycled when the roof needs to be replaced. If you plan to own and operate the building for up to 10-15 years, roof replacement is more attractive, and if you plan to own the building for 20 years or longer, it pays to invest in a roof system that has a long service life and a long-term warranty.
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  • Budget – Be sure your budget is realistic and current (updated in the last 6 months).
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  • Roofing Partner – Pick a qualified roofing company that is locally-based, knowledgeable and certified.

 

When you use these roofing system selection tips you are more likely to get the most ideal roofing system for your facility that will protect your business and employees for years to come.

 


Keep Your Building Cool in Summer with a Cool Roof

Bade Roofing - Thursday, July 12, 2018

 

Bade Roofing Offers Tips on How a Common Roofing Process Can Keep Your Building Up to 50 Degrees Cooler

As we experience the dog days of summer, building owners and managers are likely considering ways to keep their cooling costs down. This can be a particularly critical issue for anyone planning to construct a new building or planning to replace or restore an existing roof. That’s where a cool roof comes in.

A cool roof is a process by which many common roofing surfaces are made “cool” by applying coatings, which are either white or contain special reflective pigments that reflect sunlight. Cool roofs protect the roof surface from ultra-violet (UV) rays and chemical damage that can cause premature aging and drying. Additionally, cool roofs absorb less heat and keep the entire building cooler and at a more consistent temperature, thereby reducing energy usage and the corresponding expense.

According to St. Louis-based Bade Roofing Company, a standard or dark roof can reach temperatures of up to 150 degrees, but a cool roof, under the same conditions, could be more than 50 degrees cooler.

 


The photo illustrates the temperature difference between a cool roof (left) at 111degrees compared to a standard black roof at 194 degrees. Photo credit: Bade Roofing Company

“Cool roofs help keep extra heat out of a building during the summer without losing heat during the winter. This means lower energy costs as you don’t need as much air conditioning. They’re also better for the environment,” said Dave Bade, CEO of Bade Roofing Company.

Below, Bade Roofing shares some examples of common roofing types and how they can be made cool:

Built-up Roofs: Built-up roofs are the old standard tar-and-gravel combination that is typically black or dark gray. To make this roof cool, you can replace the surface layer with a UV-resistant white mineral fiberglass surface or coating.

Roof Coatings: Roof coatingsare constructed by mixing two liquid chemicals together that react and expand to form one solid piece that adheres to the roof. A reflective, protective coating can be applied to this type of roof that offers cool-roof performance.

Metal Roofs: Metal roofs can be made cool simply by painting the surface with a reflective paint or coating.

Modified Bitumen: Modified bitumen contains one or more layers of a plastic or rubber material with reinforcing materials and topped with a surfacing material. This roof type can be made cool by adding a cool-roof coating to achieve a high solar reflectance.

Shingles, Slate, or Tile: These roofing products are used for steeper-sloped commercial buildings. For cool asphalt shingles, you’ll need to use specially coated granules that provide better solar reflectance. Slate and tile products are available with solar-reflective surfaces in a variety of colors.

Single-ply: Single-ply roofing is a pre-fabricated sheet that is rolled onto the roof in a single layer and attached with mechanical fasteners, adhered with chemical adhesives, or held in place with gravel, stones or pavers. To make this roof type cool, single-ply roofing products can be ordered with ultra-violet-resistant and highly reflective surfaces.

 

For more information about cool roof coating systems, contact Dave Bade of Bade Roofing at 314-892-1331 or visit baderoofing.com.


 

 

​ Steps for Selecting a Commercial Roofer

Bade Roofing - Thursday, July 12, 2018

Selecting a commercial roofer isn’t only about evaluating the proposals from each roofing contractor you’ve contacted.

There’s a great deal more to consider. Following these steps when selecting a commercial roofer can help.

 

 

STEP #1 Location – Find a local roofing company that has a good reputation and local references. Local commercial roofers will be more concerned about maintaining a good reputation in your area. Look for good references and roofing companies with a long, well-established history of business.

 

STEP #2 Weather Expert – Look for a local roofing company that truly understands your climate and building needs. Commercial roofers with proven on-time weather response experts are ideal, especially when your area experiences unpredictable and often extreme weather patterns like the ones here in St. Louis.

 

STEP #3 Responsive – Search for a local roofing company that has a great reputation for response and proactive support for your needs. A good commercial roofer has a team that works with the latest technology, bringing a fully integrated response team ready to protect their customers' buildings.

 

STEP #4 Certified – Be sure to find a local roofing company that is certified and respected in the area they service. Look to roofing system manufacturers and the contractors they have certified and awarded in categories that recognize superior workmanship, consistency, and continued dedication to perfection.

 

STEP #5 Union – It is important that your local roofing company has a good reputation with your local craftsmen. When there is mutual respect, local craftsmen perform the highest quality work and quantity of work, maximize their skills and abilities, exercise safe and productive work practices, eliminate those practices that reduce their contractors’ profit margins, and treat their signatory contractors as their partners in business.

 

STEP #6 Local Economy – Consider what local roofing companies employ the residence of your community at large. You want a commercial roofer that not only knows your needs, but also knows your neighborhood; a commercial roofer who doesn’t need to Google your business address to know who and where you are.

 

STEP #7 Professional – Find a responsive local roofing company with knowledge and expert advice you can count on when you need it. Roof management is a complex and time-consuming challenge. That’s why finding a dedicated commercial roofing team ready with expert solutions and quality craftsmanship is essential.

 

STEP #8 Quality – Look for the local roofing company with the best range of roofing expertise. Proper installation is critical with the best roofing warranties awarded for the best roofing installation. To ensure your roof is installed properly for the best warranty coverage you’ll want to select a manufacturer-recognized commercial roofer that continually installs their products with the utmost quality.

When you’ve followed these eight steps, you’re more likely to partner with the commercial roofer that’s right for you.

 

Call Bade Roofing Today! 314-892-1331

 

Maintenance: Getting Your Commercial Roof Ready for Colder Weather and Snow

Bade Roofing - Tuesday, December 19, 2017

December 21, the official first day of winter, is only a few days away. That means colder weather, snow, ice and slush are on the way. Winter weather can cause significant roofing problems, particularly for business owners and building managers, so it is important to make sure your roof is ready for winter now to save the time, money and headaches down the road.

 

Get to Know Your Roof

To reduce the risk of leaks or a whole roof sections collapsing, it is important to inspect the roof including the decking, insulation, underlayment, surface membrane, flashing, as well as all roof vents and drainage pipes/gutters. Split seams, cracks, holes, buckles, and blisters are the most common problems, but out-of-place fasteners, defective flashing, clogged drainage systems, and rooftop debris can also compromise your roof during the cold season.

 

During the inspection, jot down anything troublesome that you find. This will make it easier to act on problems that arise. If possible, you should also take a picture of anything that could become a problem because this can give a professional a visual of the issue without you needing to get back on the roof.

 

Assemble Your Roofing Team

The time to develop a relationship with roofing contractors is before you have an emergency. It is important to identify a team that knows how to safely remove excess snow from the roof. It is equally important to identify skilled roofers who know how to quickly find and eliminate leaks. Have your roofing team’s contact information handy if you need to reach them quickly.

 

Big Snows Equal Big Problems
Snow on the roof is a hazard, but excessive snow can lead to roof collapse. A fresh, dry snow can add 20 pounds per cubic foot to your roof, but wet snow or partially thawed-and-refrozen snow, can add as much 60 pounds per cubic foot of pressure. Therefore, it is critical to have heavy snows promptly removed from your roof, particularly in warmer climates where roofs generally aren't designed to bear the weight of heavy snow loads.

 

The Time to Act is Now

It may not possible to completely eliminate the risk of wintertime roof damage, but by taking steps now, you can minimize the risks dramatically. First, conduct a proper commercial roof inspection to identify issues that may leave your roofing system susceptible to major damage during the winter months. Then, identify the contractors who will comprise your roofing team, and keep their contact information close at hand. Lastly, repair troublesome areas now and quickly remove falling snows to help your roof endure the winter so you can protect your investment.

In the News...

Bade Roofing - Tuesday, July 05, 2016

Facility Executive features Bade Roofing in Question of the Week...



 


 

How to Avoid Roof Damage

Bade Roofing - Tuesday, June 07, 2016

A roof is a big investment, one you want to protect so it lasts for as many years as possible. That’s why it’s essential to watch for the most common roof problems. Catching roof damage early and repairing it can save you thousands of dollars and in some cases, the cost of replacing the entire roof. Here are important steps to take to avoid roof damage.

 

Work with a professional. Proper installation is critical with the best roofing warranties awarded for the best roofing installation. When a roof system’s materials are not properly installed, the likelihood of problems dramatically increases and the roof system’s life expectancy is reduced.

 

Routine inspections and maintenance. None of us have any control over the weather but we can control our reaction to it. Moisture from wind, rain, hail, snow, ice, and debris can get under the layers of roof and cause leaks, mold and rot. Having your roof routinely inspected and maintained can identify problems and stop leaks from getting any worse.

 

Evict the critters. You’d be amazed at the surprising amount of damage small animals, birds, and insects can cause. You’re better off evicting them before they get a foot in the door, let alone a foothold.

 

Properly installed flashing. Flashing seals the areas around vent pipes, sky lights, chimneys and HVAC units. In addition to open seams and laps that can ultimately cause tiles to blow off, improperly installed flashing also reduces the puncture resistance in your roof.

 

Proper drainage. A sure sign of a problem is water that stands or ponds on a roof. Debris from fallen tree branches and leaves as well as improper drainage around HVAC units and gutters are all common causes for ponding water. Routine inspections and maintenance should identify and resolve any drainage problems with your roof.

 

Inspect sealant and flashings regularly. With the recent hail experienced here in St. Louis in recent weeks, many roofing systems have sustained damage in the form of punctures and penetrations in roofing materials. Inspecting the sealant and flashing around penetrations added after the roofing was completed should be conducted.

 

Cut back trees. If a tree is close enough to your building to pose a threat to your business, you’ll want to have it trimmed or removed. Tree branches can fall on a roof and cause serious damage. Overhanging tree limbs can rub on roofing materials and wear away the protective top layer.

 

Install walkways. Walking on your roof can cause damage. This is why many professional roofers install walkways with double the roofing materials to allow access to HVAC and other areas.

 

Proper Ventilation. An integral part of making a roof last is proper roof and attic ventilation. If ventilation is left unchecked, heat and moisture can build up resulting in damage to rafters, sheathing, insulation and rising energy costs. Additionally, you could also encounter mold and mildew problems.

 

When you follow these important steps you’re doing what it takes to avoid roof damage and getting the most out of the investment you’ve made in your roof.


 

In the News...

Bade Roofing - Monday, May 02, 2016

Check out what Construction Forum St. Louis says about selecting a green roof!

 


Several Factors to Review Before Considering a Green Roof

Bade Roofing - Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Green roofs are an ideal way for building owners to lower their heating and cooling costs, provide additional insulation, help manage storm water and transform an ordinary roof into a nature retreat for tenants.

 

 

And while the demand for green roofs has steadily increased since 2004, particularly in densely populated metropolitan areas, there are several factors building owners should consider before investing in a green roof for their structure.

 

"Government entities and large corporations are the primary purchasers of green roofing systems, however, there is a growing trend for green roofs within the condominium, loft and apartment building high-rise market segments," said David Bade, owner of St. Louis-based Bade Roofing Company. "These owners are looking to convert their less appealing, old roofs and patios into lush living spaces."

 

A large percentage of the green roofs that Bade has seen in the St. Louis area have been concentrated primarily in metropolitan areas where a green roof is tied to refurbishing an existing structure. Such was the case in 2014 when Bade Roofing was contracted to install a green roofing system on a historic building in Downtown St. Louis that was being redeveloped. Bade crews helped install the rooftop garden courtyard on the building's 5th floor and re-roofed its 6th floor. The green roof boasts views of the Gateway Arch, Busch Stadium and the Old Courthouse and incorporates three-color concrete pavers, various trees and shrubs, a fescue lawn area, lighting, seating areas, watering system and a gas fire pit.

 

On a green roof retrofit, Bade says it's important to keep in mind that the existing structure was likely not designed with a green roof in mind. The components that make up a green roofing system can be very heavy. Stone ballasts, pavers, trays, trees and soil that become saturated after a rain all contribute to the load that the roof deck and building itself will have to endure. Bade recommends that the building be analyzed by a certified structural engineer during the planning of any green roof project.

 

Another important factor that building owners should consider is "what happens if there is a leak in my green roof?" Unlike a conventional roofing system where the roof is exposed, the waterproofing components of a green roof are often buried underneath the stone ballast, pavers, growing trays, trees and soil. Bade says an owner and their architect need to be cognizant of repair factors when designing a green build.

 

"It's best to use light-weight components; ones that don't penetrate the roof system, can be easily moved and don't interfere with roof drainage," said Bade.

 

When it comes to the roof top vegetation, Bade said building owners need to remember one very important tip, "the taller a plant grows up, the deeper the roots grow down." Bade recommends using growing trays, planter boxes or plants with shallow root systems, as vegetation should not be in direct contact with the roof membrane.

 

"I have seen plants growing in the dirt and debris that collects on roofs and I have actually seen the roots growing down right through the roofing itself," Bade said.

 

Finally, Bade recommends that building owners check with their local governments for green building incentives and funding to assist with construction costs.

 

The Most Effective Roof Management Plans

Bade Roofing - Tuesday, September 01, 2015

As a facility manager you’re familiar with the old adage, "There are only two types of roofs—those that leak and those that will leak."


Plant engineers, property managers, and building owners alike have come to accept that their roofs will all eventually fail which is why they buy the best new roofs they can afford and make the most of their existing roofs to lessen the impact on their bottom line.

 

 

As a facility manager, the last things you want are leaks and compromised relations with your buildings’ occupants. Experienced facility managers know the best way to make the most of their roofs is with an effective roof management plan. Here are some things to consider.

 

 

Start with a good roof.

When you select a roof that follows good roof design and installation practices your roof stands a better chance of reaching its potential design life. Quality products, appropriate design and material selection along with care and quality of installation are what make for a good roof.

 

Finding the best product and roofing contractor takes time and research which is why many facility managers are tempted to choose the same product for all their facility roofs. Problem is, choosing the same quality material for a different roof forces designers and roofers to “make” a material work when other products or materials would work better. Rarely, does one product fit every need. This is why defining and understanding site-specific design requirements and selecting the roofing solution to best meet those requirements will prevent leaks and further problems from occurring in the long run.

 

Good roofing design considers building code requirements (wind, hail, fire, energy ratings), slope/drainage issues, roof traffic/roof durability, climate exposure, construction access (getting equipment and materials on and off the roof) occupancy issues (noise, dust, fumes), your long-term goals and your budget. A complete roof design also provides detail drawings of how all the various building components connect and shed water which reduces the number of RFOs (Roofer Figure Out).


progressive commercial roofing specialists, since 1954

P: 314 892-1331

3806 Lemay Ferry Rd.

St. Louis, MO 63125

progressive commercial roofing specialists, since 1954

St. Louis commercial roofing specialists, since 1954